Blog - Jo Alcock Consulting
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I've recently co-authored an article with Christine Rooney-Browne for Refer, the journal of the Information Services group of CILIP, which has now been published in the Autumn 2009 issue. Refer offer some of the material from their journal online at REFERplus, and our article is available in pdf format, please feel free to read and let myself or Christine know what you think. The article, "Blogging: an opportunity to communicate, participate and collaborate on a global scale", is written primarily for reference librarians, although the majority of the material is general in nature. It was an interesting article to write; much...

  by  Karl Hab  I've just finished reading Paco Underhill's book Why we buy: the science of shopping, which was recommended during Rachel Van Riel's talk at the CoFHE conference earlier this year. It's a fascinating book for anyone interested in marketing, retail or human behaviour. The version I read was the 2000 edition so there have obviously been more developments in the way we shop since then (in one chapter he talks about the futuristic way we may scan our own shopping in at the supermarket!), but a lot of the principles discussed I imagine remain. This is of particular importance now...

Last Friday was CILIP's Graduate Open Day where I spoke about Realising your potential: marketing yourself using online tools. Emma Illingsworth and Ned Potter have written posts about the day, but I thought I'd add my own views too.There seemed to be a lot of people there; I spoke to Kathy Ennis and Lindsay Rees-Jones (nice to put a face to the name!) who were really pleased with the number of people at the event. It was great to catch up with Emma, Ned and Chris Rhodes who were also speaking - all of whom I met earlier at the New...

In my last post, I mentioned that I would be writing a post about how I got into librarianship, following a meme going round. Ned Potter has now set up a Library Routes wiki to record all these posts, in a similar way to the Day in the Life wiki. It's really interesting reading everyone's posts and I also think it could be very useful for anyone considering entering the profession to see how others got there. Here's my story anyway...

There've been a couple of blog memes going round the UK biblioblogosphere ( library bloggers!), so I thought I'd join in. The first is a post about how you got into librarianship, which I'll write later this week, and today's is Reading Habits (so far completed by WoodsieGirl, Jaffne, stupidgirl_no1, iOverlord and infobunny). I'm writing this one first as Infobunny asked us all to write it and I must obey Bunny - as should you, so please feel free to carry the meme on with your own reading habits. Do you snack while you read? If so, favorite reading snack? Not usually, no....

I met Kathy Ennis from CILIP at the New Professionals Conference earlier in summer and she asked a few of us from the day if we could also speak at the CILIP Graduate Open Day. The theme of the day is marketing yourself, which was also the message in my talk at New Professionals Conference, so I was happy to accept the invitation to speak. I'll be presenting a similar presentation to before, and will be focusing on using blogging, microblogging and social networking to market yourself and your skills online. As well as a series of presentations, the day...

The latest issue of CILIP West Midlands journal, Open Access, is a special edition on Web 2.0. It contains articles from librarians throughout the region,and I was pleased to be asked to contribute. The editor, David Viner, asked if I could write about professional networking using Web 2.0 tools and I was happy to oblige - a similar article from the viewpoint of Amelia Luzzi, an information professional currently working outside a library is also presented which gives an interesting comparison. There are also practical guides for using Web 2.0, overviews of Web 2.0 projects within the region, and a look at the Semantic Web and...

We're coming to the end of Fresher's Week and as the title says I am feeling shattered! We've spent a long time preparing for inductions over summer, and this week has been really hectic (with staff illness, last minute sessions, and general running around like a headless chicken!), so I can't wait until I finish work today so that I can rest! I always look forward to the students coming back though, and this year is no exception. The University seems so empty without them, and one of the most rewarding aspects of the job for me is working...

The UK newspaper Guardian occasionally have articles on academic libraries. Normally they're not too favourable, but last week there was a really interesting article about how academic libraries are undergoing a quiet revolution. The article talks about how the information environment is changing and with that the role of the academic librarian must adapt from one of a keeper of information to one of a marketer of services and teacher/trainer to help students (and academics) use the right services with the appropriate tools and techniques to get the best information. The article features insights from academic librarians in the UK and gives...

I've been busy busy busy recently - academic librarians always seem to have so much they hope to achieve in summer and then you blink and suddenly it's almost time for the students to return! Anyway, just a short post to share some exciting news - my first peer reviewed article has been published in Program. :) I mentioned a while ago that I had contributed to a paper for Bridging Worlds 2008 conference, and Program have run a special edition featuring selected papers from the conference. It seems like such a long time ago when I first wrote my...