Productivity Archives - Page 2 of 2 - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Productivity

[caption id="attachment_1508" align="aligncenter" width="320" caption="ILI 2011 (apologies for poor photo!)"]ILI 2011[/caption] Last week I attended my first full Internet Librarian International conference. It's an event I've often followed virtually and this year was really pleased to be able to attend and present on using web tools to improve productivity for librarians (see previous blog post for more information). I attended really interesting sessions, met great people and had engaging discussions.

Last week at Internet Librarian International 2011 I gave a presentation on productivity for librarians. I'm a fan of the GTD (Getting Things Done) methodology and like to utilise online software to help organise my work and increase my productivity. I thought I'd give a brief overview of some of the tips I've picked up along the way as well as sharing some of my favourite productivity tools.

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="240" caption="To do list by dmachiavello on Flickr"]To do list by dmachiavello on Flickr[/caption] One of my resolutions this year was to integrate the GTD (Getting Things Done) methodology into my work and home life. I'm a bit of a productivity tool geek, I'm always downloading a new to-do list or note taking app on my iPhone or iPad to check out. My journey with to-do lists has taken me down a long and winding road. I was an avid fan of good old pen and paper (and to-do list notepads and post-its!) for a number of years, dabbled with using Microsoft OneNote a few years ago, and started my online discovery with Toodledo in about 2007. It integrated with my start page (Pageflakes at the time) and I could use it on my iPod touch; I really liked the fact I could access it from anywhere and keep it updated. So much so in fact that I blogged about it. After a while I got fed up of Toodledo (let's face it, it's functional but pretty ugly) and wanted to see what all the fuss was with Remember The Milk (RTM), which had been growing in popularity. This is a really simple, yet feature rich customisable service and a lot of people love it. I used to be one of those people and had a pro subscription for two years. 

[caption id="attachment_1297" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="CPD23 logo"]CPD23 logo[/caption] Many readers are likely to have heard of the 23 Things staff development programmes (also known as Learning 2.0) which have been used in a number of libraries across the world over the last few years. For those not familiar - it's an online self-discovery learning programme used to introduce library staff to some of the technologies relevant to libraries (particularly social media). It's achieved via a reflective blog which serves as an introduction to blogging as well as recording progress on each of the 23 'Things' thoughout. In the UK, a number of public and academic libraries have run the programme, including Cambridge who did it last summer. Some of the Cambridge librarians loved it so much that they're doing it again - in fact this summer they are running two versions! The first is a repeat of the initial programme, whilst the second is what this blog post is about - 23 Things for Professional Development. So what's that then?

I'm fascinated by personality and how it affects the way we work; my Psychology A-level was one of the most interesting courses I've taken and my undergraduate dissertation (on Sports Psychology) focused on individual personality differences and their impact on sport participation. I've also always loved taking personality tests to try to find out more about myself. So I was pleasantly surprised when I found out about a book by Devora Zack titled 'Networking for people who hate networking: a field guide for introverts, the overwhelmed, and the underconnected'. Now I don't hate networking, but I do find it difficult so thought this book might be able to help (plus it has pictures on penguins on the cover and within the chapters, which was always going to sway me!). I decided to buy a copy for my Kindle and have really enjoyed reading it.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="True phone by cizake on Flickr"]True phone[/caption] Picture the scene: a researcher and research director sat in an office around a faded cream plastic telephone with the headset lying upwards on the desk, listening to a call on speakerphone and taking turns to shout into the mouthpiece. The person on the other end of the line can't seem to pick up the director's voice so the researcher has to repeat everything the director says so that the caller can hear. Not exactly an ideal situation for a conference call is it? But things are much better than that nowadays aren't they?