Professional issues Archives - Page 2 of 6 - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Professional issues

Wow, what a day! I really enjoyed Library Camp UK 2011 yesterday, and wanted to jot down some quick thoughts from a personal perspective whilst it's fresh in my mind. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="One of my sessions - really enjoyed the conversation at this one"]Sarah points out the next session[/caption]

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="240" caption="Professor Charles Oppenheim with keynote speakers"]LIS DREaM Launch Conference[/caption] I recently attended the LIS DREaM launch conference about developing research excellence and methods in library and information science. I wrote a blog post about my experience, but now I've had chance to reflect on the day I'm going to share my reflections using the basic method I learnt during 23 Things for Professional Development - what? so what? now what?

I'm very fortunate to be in the position where I am able to get involved in a number of professional activities - committee work, presenting at conferences, publishing articles etc. I really enjoy these activities and like to be involved in the profession both for my own personal development and to help others; it can be very rewarding. However, sometimes you have to say no to things. It might be something that you don't feel capable of doing (or you know someone else could do a far better job); it might be that it's something you're not as passionate about as your other commitments (or maybe even something you don't agree with or have ethical issues with); or it may simply be that you can't fit everything in. Laura wrote an excellent post recently about prioritising activities and finding time for yourself - something I have recently come to realise is incredibly important. I've had to think recently about my priorities to help me manage my time effectively and ensure I have time to do the activities which are important to me, and I thought I'd reflect on this process.

As a personal member of both CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals) based in the UK, and ALA (American Library Association) based in the US, and being involved in a CILIP branch committee and a group committee, I'm always interested to find out about what the professional organisations do and how I, as a member, can keep up-to-date and get involved where appropriate. So when the opportunity to attend ALA's first Virtual Town Hall, an online webinar, I was interested to find out more and signed up. I'm a relatively new ALA member so I don't know much about the structure of ALA yet and I'm still learning about the different groups and round tables, but I thought this would be a good opportunity to find out more about central ALA issues and some of the priorities of the organisation. It happened tonight (I'm writing this as it happens!) and I am so impressed that I wanted to share some thoughts about the organisation of the session and something we can maybe bear in mind for similar CILIP events.

[caption id="attachment_1297" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="CPD23 logo"]CPD23 logo[/caption] Many readers are likely to have heard of the 23 Things staff development programmes (also known as Learning 2.0) which have been used in a number of libraries across the world over the last few years. For those not familiar - it's an online self-discovery learning programme used to introduce library staff to some of the technologies relevant to libraries (particularly social media). It's achieved via a reflective blog which serves as an introduction to blogging as well as recording progress on each of the 23 'Things' thoughout. In the UK, a number of public and academic libraries have run the programme, including Cambridge who did it last summer. Some of the Cambridge librarians loved it so much that they're doing it again - in fact this summer they are running two versions! The first is a repeat of the initial programme, whilst the second is what this blog post is about - 23 Things for Professional Development. So what's that then?

I'm fascinated by personality and how it affects the way we work; my Psychology A-level was one of the most interesting courses I've taken and my undergraduate dissertation (on Sports Psychology) focused on individual personality differences and their impact on sport participation. I've also always loved taking personality tests to try to find out more about myself. So I was pleasantly surprised when I found out about a book by Devora Zack titled 'Networking for people who hate networking: a field guide for introverts, the overwhelmed, and the underconnected'. Now I don't hate networking, but I do find it difficult so thought this book might be able to help (plus it has pictures on penguins on the cover and within the chapters, which was always going to sway me!). I decided to buy a copy for my Kindle and have really enjoyed reading it.

As I mentioned in my previous post, I've been thinking recently about advocacy and educating people; not necessarily on a huge scale like some of the campaigning going on in the library world, but on an individual level. It's sort of a double pronged approach - doing things at ground level to help spread the word as well as some of the larger scale campaigns. Some examples As a librarian, I often end up in conversations where I try to explain what I do to people. I'm not as good as I'd like to be at it, especially since moving to research...

Library definition
Library definition from Collins
Quite a lot actually, when you're a librarian. A recurring professional issue in librarianship is defining what a librarian does to a member of the public. Laura (Theatregradrecently blogged about her experiences as a librarianship student discussing her course with other students, giving a really interesting perspective. What is a librarian anyway? We have the traditional stereotypes - the middle aged woman wearing a bun with a twin set and glasses on string around her neck. What does she do? Well she's knowledgeable, but she's a bit stuffy and reluctant to share information - you have to ask very nicely and you have to be very quiet when in her presence. I'll admit that I held this perception of a librarian until I graduated from my undergraduate degree in 2005 and starting trying to find out about librarianship (this fact is ever present in my mind when I talk to people outside the profession).

This week I’m participating in the Library Day in the Life project which charts the day-to-day activities of library workers at different points of the year. This is the fourth time I’ve participated; you can see my earlier posts from July 2009, January 2010 and July 2010. I’m currently a full-time Researcher at Evidence Base, Birmingham City University, UK. This will be the first time I complete the project in this role and I hope it helps explain a little bit about the type of work I do. Today I chose to work from home - I find it easier to...

This week I’m participating in the Library Day in the Life project which charts the day-to-day activities of library workers at different points of the year. This is the fourth time I’ve participated; you can see my earlier posts from July 2009, January 2010 and July 2010. I’m currently a full-time Researcher at Evidence Base, Birmingham City University, UK. This will be the first time I complete the project in this role and I hope it helps explain a little bit about the type of work I do. The eagle-eyed amongst you may have noticed that today is not actually Thursday (I was tempted to change the publication date but I can't bear lying to myself). But then this does tell you something about a day in the life of a librarian - it can be unpredictable and plans can change throughout the day so you have to be flexible. In my case it included a rather entertaining conference call (that's a whole other blog post!) which took far too long and ate up most of my afternoon.