Professional issues Archives - Page 4 of 6 - Jo Alcock Consulting
184
archive,paged,category,category-professional-issues,category-184,paged-4,category-paged-4,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,paspartu_enabled,paspartu_on_top_fixed,paspartu_on_bottom_fixed,qode-theme-ver-10.1.1,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive
 

Professional issues

This week I'm participating in the Library Day in the Life project which charts the day-to-day activities of library workers at different points of the year. This is the third time I've participated; you can see my earlier posts from July 2009 and January 2010. I'm a Resources Librarian at a university library in UK, and work part-time (3 days a week). This will be the last time I complete the project in this role as I have a new job to move to soon (more on this in a later blog post). Over summer I've got two main projects...

[picappgallerysingle id="5289263"]The day after the Librarians as Teachers event was a similarly themed event focusing on a different element of the librarian role - Librarian as Researcher. I wasn't able to attend this event, but I followed it via Twitter thanks to @LISResearch and @lenocsor. You can see the tweets in relation to the event at the TwapperKeeper archive. Obviously, I didn't get the benefit of attending the day's events but I did get a flavour for the discussions and could follow up links mentioned and view presentations online. I'm a keen advocate of research, making evidence-based decisions wherever possible. I'm involved in my own research as a librarian (for work-based projects and to inform elements of my job role), and I also spend my free time researching areas of interest -sometimes for articles, presentations or blog posts; sometimes just to increase my understanding. One of the things I was really impressed by at LILAC 2010 was the emphasis on research-informed information literacy teaching, using both existing research and conducting original research to help make decisions about the approach to teaching. Commitment to research by librarians is something I'd love to see more of, but I think all too often it's overlooked as other activities take priority.

[picappgallerysingle id="7291598"]Last week I attended a really interesting event hosted jointly by University, College and Research Group West Midlands and Career Development Group West Midlands. Librarians as Teachers: the New Professionals? was a very popular event, with delegates travelling from across the country to attend. I was invited to join the panel for a debate at the end of the day, presenting the opinion of a new professional. You can see a programme of the day including presentations and supporting material, and view other blog posts covering the day, or view the archive of tweets, but I wanted to share some of the themes raised during the event which I’ve been contemplating since.

I think for anyone reading this blog, you probably know I'm an avid supporter of the microblogging platform Twitter, but there have been some interesting points made recently about tweeting during events, and it's something I'd like to discuss (particularly apt at the moment as I'm "Twitter Officer" for the upcoming New Professionals Conference in July!). The focus for this post is on tweeting at events, not tweeting in general. My own experiences have taught me that sometimes it is acceptable (and encouraged) to tweet during an event, and sometimes it's frowned upon. I'd also like to make it clear that of course it is unacceptable to tweet about confidential matters and therefore inappropriate to tweet internal meetings to an external audience, or to tweet any information which is sensitive or confidential. More recently I've been discussing the issue of whether or not to tweet at events with my boyfriend Chris (yes we are proper nerds and spend a lot of our free time discussing such things!). It seems it's quite a complex issue with a number of misunderstandings, as unfortunately experienced by WoodsieGirl recently. There's been an interesting debate over on CILIP Communities today which I've been following with interest, and I thought I'd share my own views and some of the arguments for and against tweeting at events. I hope to present a balanced view, although I do admit up front that I personally sit firmly in the camp who advocate tweeting at events, for the moment anyway.

[picappgallerysingle id="257026"]Defining our professional future is the new term being used for the "Big Conversation" that CILIP are having this year with their members and non-members, to establish where information professionals may be in the future and how the professional body can continue to support the changes. I'm attending a local focus group tomorrow and have been gathering some thoughts on the three key questions, but thought I'd jot them down on the blog too.

There's been quite a lot of talk on Twitter about this year's New Professionals Conference (hashtag #npc2010). It's great to see the increase in use of Twitter from last year when I think there was only me and a couple of others using a hashtag I'd made up! I'm hoping to develop further Twitter support including a list of delegates (more on this later). I'm a bit late in organising it this year but thankfully the conference is on a non-working day so I should hopefully be able to attend, I'm just trying to get this confirmed at the moment. For anyone...

Some readers will remember my nerves followed by enjoyment when I spoke at my first conference last year - the New Professionals Conference. As you can see from my write up of the experience, I really enjoyed the conference - there was such a buzz of enthusiasm. Following the success of last year's event, CILIP Career Development Group are organising New Professionals Conference 2010 this summer, this time in Sheffield. Quite a few people on Twitter seem to be considering proposing a paper, and I'd strongly encourage anyone to do so if you are eligible and you're thinking about it; it...

Yesterday I attended my first CILIP West Midlands branch committee meeting at Birmingham Central Library (where I must investigate sometime, can't believe I've never been in before!). I'm the new Marketing Officer for the branch which I'm really excited about. Marketing in the library and information sector is becoming increasingly more important at the moment, particularly with budget cuts, and I know from my own experience that many in CILIP (Chartered Institute for Library and Information Professionals) are unaware of some of the benefits available to them as members. There is also a large number of information professionals who are not...