Public speaking Archives - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Public speaking

Last week I attended a UKSG workshop called 'Make Yourself Heard' which was for anyone wanting to improve their public speaking skills. Public speaking is something I do quite a lot of in my day job, and although I enjoy it and I'm generally a lot more comfortable with it than I used to be, I can still get very nervous. I'd hoped the workshop might give me some tips on how to better prepare and how to manage my nerves. [caption width="401" align="aligncenter"] Speaking at CILIP Conference 2015 (I was unusually nervous at this one)[/caption] Within the first few minutes I...

Back in 2009 a terrified version of myself, along with a group of others who were apprehensive if not terrified also, presented my first conference presentation. It was the New Professionals Conference in London and I had to stand on a stage in front of over 100 people and share a presentation I'd written. I say "had to" but actually I'd chosen to. I wanted to share my experiences using social networking (a relatively new thing back then!) and encourage other librarians to join me in blogging and tweeting. I wanted to experience public speaking at a professional conference to...

Another year has flown past and it's time for my annual review - you can see previous ones for 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. 2013 has been a funny old year; nothing particularly terrible has happened, but I haven't felt as positive as I usually do and this has been reflected by a decrease in blogging and use of social media. It's not all bad though, as another reason for this decrease is a continuation of what I mentioned last year as a major lesson - trying to achieve a more sustainable work-life balance. This year I've been doing a...

I was invited this year to give a presentation at the CILIP in Wales 2012 conference on leadership. As leadership is one area I'm really keen to develop skills in I was delighted - this enabled me to both share my own progress so far (and hopefully help others plan their leadership journey during my workshop), and also to attend the conference to learn from those more experienced than myself. My presentation focused on how you can develop leadership skills through professional engagement, particularly through supporting professional organisations. It's no secret that I'm a keen advocate for professional organisations - my volunteering for them is a reciprocal relationship. I benefit greatly from getting involved in a wide variety of things I wouldn't ordinarily be able to do within the scope of my day job (thus developing a broader skill set), and the organisations benefit from my input to committees/projects/task forces/working groups.

As I mentioned in my earlier post on How to run a great workshop, I tried out some new techniques at the CDG workshop I ran a few weeks ago. Now that I've had a little time to both reflect personally and to digest the feedback from attendees, I thought I'd share the things that worked well, the things that didn't, and the main areas I'd like to improve on. [caption id="attachment_1792" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Workshop for CILIP CDG"]cdgworkshop[/caption]

Last week, I gave a seminar on 'Managing yourself: how to be productive with your time'. I'd been invited by CILIP Career Development Group London and South East branches to deliver a session on this topic which expanded on my presentation from Internet Librarian International 2012 on Productivity for Librarians. The focus of this seminar was much more practical in nature so rather than just talking through some of the tools I use and the way I implement the Getting Things Done (GTD) methodology, we went through each stage of the GTD methodology and considered how it could be implemented...

Last week I gave my first ever webinar as part of the American Library Association (ALA) Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) Mobile Computing Interest Group (MCIG) virtual meeting.* It took place instead of a physical meeting at ALA Midwinter to enable more people to attend and present. There were five presentations in 90 minutes so we each had 10 minutes to present and 5 minutes of Q&A. If you're interested in the topic, you can watch a recording of the webinar - see the blog post I wrote for our m-library community support project blog. I thought it would be useful to reflect on my experiences of presenting a webinar - I'm noticing more and more webinars set up to enable more people to attend virtually across different time zones and without the expense of travelling, so I imagine presenting at webinars is something we'll be seeing a lot more of in future.This is my setup - home office with laptop for webinar software, headset for listening/speaking, iPhone for timing, and iPad and notepad for presentation prompts (and all important glass of Ribena!): [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Webinar setup"]Webinar setup[/caption]

I'm a creature of habit, so I'm continuing the tradition of posting an end of year blog post (see 2008, 2009, and 2010). It's actually really useful for me to look back and see what I did each year. So, what has 2011 involved? 2011 mosaic 1. My ALA 2011 badge complete with ribbons!, 2. Louisiana State University, 3. Osney Building at University of Oxford, 4. CILIP signage

At Online Information 2011, I presented in one of the European Librarians Theatre panel discussions. The discussions are hosted by EBSCO and SLA Europe and bring together librarians from different parts of Europe to discuss a topic and the experiences within their country. My session, 'Everyone is talking but is anyone listening?' focused on social media. It was chaired by Sara Batts (see tweet below), and my fellow panelists were Katrin Weller and Dennie Haye.   I think the panel discussion flowed well - there was largely agreement across the board on a number of different factors, suggesting that libraries across Europe are at a similar stage with social media (the panel had representatives from UK, Germany and The Netherlands). There were some really interesting examples from my fellow panelists - one example of Yammer being used for internal communication (in an international organisation with staff dispersed geographically), and one example of Facebook being used by a University before students arrived to help answers queries and help them begin to make friends. The main messages I took from the session were that libraries and librarians should experiment with social media to see what works, and should aim to understand more about their users as no two libraries will use social media in the same way. You can see the tweets from the session at the #elt2011 hashtag (thanks to @WoodsieGirl and @EBSCOUK for such comprehensive tweeting!) and there is a write up of the session on the SLA Europe website. As mentioned before, I decided to get  information for my section of the discussion via a brief survey - many thanks to those who gave feedback. The main themes emerging from the results of this are shown below.