Public speaking Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Public speaking

At Online Information 2011, I presented in one of the European Librarians Theatre panel discussions. The discussions are hosted by EBSCO and SLA Europe and bring together librarians from different parts of Europe to discuss a topic and the experiences within their country. My session, 'Everyone is talking but is anyone listening?' focused on social media. It was chaired by Sara Batts (see tweet below), and my fellow panelists were Katrin Weller and Dennie Haye.   I think the panel discussion flowed well - there was largely agreement across the board on a number of different factors, suggesting that libraries across Europe are at a similar stage with social media (the panel had representatives from UK, Germany and The Netherlands). There were some really interesting examples from my fellow panelists - one example of Yammer being used for internal communication (in an international organisation with staff dispersed geographically), and one example of Facebook being used by a University before students arrived to help answers queries and help them begin to make friends. The main messages I took from the session were that libraries and librarians should experiment with social media to see what works, and should aim to understand more about their users as no two libraries will use social media in the same way. You can see the tweets from the session at the #elt2011 hashtag (thanks to @WoodsieGirl and @EBSCOUK for such comprehensive tweeting!) and there is a write up of the session on the SLA Europe website. As mentioned before, I decided to get  information for my section of the discussion via a brief survey - many thanks to those who gave feedback. The main themes emerging from the results of this are shown below.

I've been asked to take part in a panel discussion as part of the European Librarians Theatre at Online Information next week titled 'Everyone is talking but is anyone listening?'. I've got some ideas from my own experience and conversations with others, but as I'll be representing the views of the UK I wanted to open it out and ask you to help me. If you work in a UK library, please complete the form below (or complete the online version) to let me know your views. The feedback is anonymous - though if you have something you are particularly proud...

[caption id="attachment_1508" align="aligncenter" width="320" caption="ILI 2011 (apologies for poor photo!)"]ILI 2011[/caption] Last week I attended my first full Internet Librarian International conference. It's an event I've often followed virtually and this year was really pleased to be able to attend and present on using web tools to improve productivity for librarians (see previous blog post for more information). I attended really interesting sessions, met great people and had engaging discussions.

Last week at Internet Librarian International 2011 I gave a presentation on productivity for librarians. I'm a fan of the GTD (Getting Things Done) methodology and like to utilise online software to help organise my work and increase my productivity. I thought I'd give a brief overview of some of the tips I've picked up along the way as well as sharing some of my favourite productivity tools.

Wow, what a day! I really enjoyed Library Camp UK 2011 yesterday, and wanted to jot down some quick thoughts from a personal perspective whilst it's fresh in my mind. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="One of my sessions - really enjoyed the conversation at this one"]Sarah points out the next session[/caption]

Tomorrow I'm joining 174 other people interested in libraries at the first Library Camp UK. I'm hoping it's going to be a little more civilised than the photo above - at least it should be drier as it's indoors. It's being held in Birmingham so I don't even have to travel far (although getting up early on a Saturday will be a bit of a shock!).

Earlier today I gave a presentation at the Oxford Social Media 2011 event hosted by Oxford University Libraries. The brief was to discuss ways to market yourself as a librarian using social media, and rather than just update my previous presentation on a similar topic, I chose to change the focus slightly and concentrate on the marketing and personal branding side of things rather than the fundamentals of social media.

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="240" caption="from misterbisson on Flickr"]an SMS message from the catalog[/caption] As I mentioned in a previous post, I was invited to present a session at the 2011 Colleges of Further and Higher Education (CoFHE) conference last month (Staying positive in difficult times: Maintaining quality services). My session focused on mobile technologies. I probably spend about half, if not more, of my online time on mobile devices - usually on iPhone or iPad. I use a lot of different apps for various different purposes - document creation and editing, emailing, blogging, photo management, planning travel, time management and more. But how can we utilise these technologies in libraries? Many of our users (and staff) already have mobile devices, so it's useful to consider how we can use these to support the library service.

I was recently invited to speak to a group of school librarians in Hatch End about how they can start to prepare students for university. I gave a similar presentation last November at the Digital Natives event for school librarians, though I updated my presentation and added views of other academic librarians.

[caption id="attachment_1279" align="alignleft" width="224" caption="Mobile text polling with PollEverywhere"][/caption] I am delighted to be speaking at the 2011 CoFHE Conference next month on mobile technologies in libraries. My interest in mobile technologies largely stems from my own experimentation with various different mobile apps and thinking about how they can be applied to a library setting. I've blogged previously about some mobile library apps (and played with many more on my iPhone/iPad), discussed some of the potential uses of QR codes in the library (which have been popping up in lots of places since I blogged about them), and talked about the...