Public speaking Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Public speaking

[picappgallerysingle id="302609"]Continuing on the tradition from 2008 and 2009, it's time for my end of year blog post. As a naturally reflective person, I find it very useful to reflect back on my achievements of the year and consider what to focus on next. It's also useful to look at my previous end of year posts and look back at what I've done in the last few years. So what did 2010 bring? Well, I certainly satisfied that itch I mentioned this time last year!

I was recently invited to present at a UKOLN Cultural Heritage event on using the social web. Ann Chapman facilitated the workshop which introduced people to the basics of social web and encouraged them to think about how social web could be used in their own organisation. There were attendees from libraries, museums, and archives and the small group size (less than 20 delegates) encouraged open conversation throughout the day. I attended the whole day, supporting facilitation in the morning and presenting my case study in the afternoon.

Last week, I was invited to give a presentation to a school librarian conference from the perspective of a university librarian. As the conference theme was digital natives, I decided to focus on the transition between school and university and how school librarians can prepare students for university life. I took a different approach to the presentation, and decided to take a journey with a typical student through the first month or so of university, and at each milestone consider what he needs to do and how school librarians could help him prepare for that. I had initially hoped to try using Prezi to illustrate the journey, but my artistic/creative skills are somewhat lacking (as is my experience of using Prezi) so I didn't manage to find time to do this. I know there were both school and university librarians interested in this whilst I was preparing the presentation, so I have embedded my slides below, and have also included the rough script. NB: I didn't stick to the script when I presented (I prefer the presentation to involve the participants in discussion), but I used it to help me contextualise the presentation before the event. All the resources mentioned are on Delicious using the sch2uni tag; if you know of any other useful resources that I didn't mention, please add them to Delicious using the sch2uni tag. I really enjoyed preparing for this event, and the actual day was fantastic (see my earlier blog post). I think there is a lot that can be learnt by bringing together school and university librarians, it's definitely given me food for thought about how we can work together to improve digital literacy and help the transition between school and university. If you have any thoughts on this, please let me know (either by email or in the comments).

[picappgallerysingle id="210560"] What a fantastic event! I was privileged to be invited to speak at the 2010 Independent Professional Development Conference for school librarians to give a perspective from a university librarian. The theme of the event was digital natives, and we had a host of different speakers giving different perspectives; a school media specialist, school librarian, resource suppliers, hardware suppliers, an independent consultant, and myself. Before I talk about the sessions, I have a slight confession to make; ever since my first experience in a library (which was at a local secondary school), I've been longing to go to a school librarian event. I absolutely loved my time at the school library, and worked with a fantastic school librarian who ignited my passion for librarianship. Since then I have worked in mainly university libraries (and a public library), but I've always followed some of the work going on in school libraries. So I was delighted when Rachael Guy, who organised the conference, contacted me to see if I would be interested in giving a talk. I jumped at the opportunity and really enjoyed putting together my presentation. I'll do a separate blog post about the subject of my presentation, but wanted to share a review of the whole day first.

The second workshop I ran at the CoFHE/UC&R Joint Conference was aimed primarily at new professionals, although much of the content was relevant to all - it was titled "New professionals: build your network using social media". I updated some of the material from similar presentations I have given previously, and extended the scope to include tools and tips to help build a network. The main focus of the presentation was blogging and microblogging as they are the social media tools I've gained most from personally. I also touched on the use of social networking and we had interesting discussions around Facebook and LinkedIn.

Earlier this week, myself and Emma Illingworth (@wigglesweets and half of Librarians on the Loose) presented a joint workshop at CoFHE/UC&R Joint Conference 2010 titled “Your library brand and the student experience”. Although neither of us are directly involved in this sort of work in our institutions, it’s something we’re both passionate about and spend time researching, so we wanted to pull this together and share some of what we’ve learnt with others.

I think for anyone reading this blog, you probably know I'm an avid supporter of the microblogging platform Twitter, but there have been some interesting points made recently about tweeting during events, and it's something I'd like to discuss (particularly apt at the moment as I'm "Twitter Officer" for the upcoming New Professionals Conference in July!). The focus for this post is on tweeting at events, not tweeting in general. My own experiences have taught me that sometimes it is acceptable (and encouraged) to tweet during an event, and sometimes it's frowned upon. I'd also like to make it clear that of course it is unacceptable to tweet about confidential matters and therefore inappropriate to tweet internal meetings to an external audience, or to tweet any information which is sensitive or confidential. More recently I've been discussing the issue of whether or not to tweet at events with my boyfriend Chris (yes we are proper nerds and spend a lot of our free time discussing such things!). It seems it's quite a complex issue with a number of misunderstandings, as unfortunately experienced by WoodsieGirl recently. There's been an interesting debate over on CILIP Communities today which I've been following with interest, and I thought I'd share my own views and some of the arguments for and against tweeting at events. I hope to present a balanced view, although I do admit up front that I personally sit firmly in the camp who advocate tweeting at events, for the moment anyway.

[picappgallerysingle id="246905"]I thought I'd continue the tradition I started last year and end 2009 by posting a reflective blog post about the year. It's been a year full of ups and downs, mainly ups thankfully - although at times it's been difficult to focus on the positives, I've learnt a lot this year about myself. This time last year I had recently started my first professional librarian job, and one year in I'm really enjoying it - it was definitely worth all the hard work completing my Diploma. I've had the opportunity to work on projects such as improving the way we...

Last week I did something a bit different - I was asked a few weeks ago if I could be interviewed for a podcast about social media, and was pleased to accept. It was actually for a social media module at University of Aberystwyth, so I was especially pleased to be involved as I had provided feedback from my course that it had been a shame this had not been covered during my Diploma. Nicole Schultz (who also has an interest in social media) is responsible for developing the module and she came up with the great idea that it would...

Last Friday was CILIP's Graduate Open Day where I spoke about Realising your potential: marketing yourself using online tools. Emma Illingsworth and Ned Potter have written posts about the day, but I thought I'd add my own views too.There seemed to be a lot of people there; I spoke to Kathy Ennis and Lindsay Rees-Jones (nice to put a face to the name!) who were really pleased with the number of people at the event. It was great to catch up with Emma, Ned and Chris Rhodes who were also speaking - all of whom I met earlier at the New...