Reflection Archives - Page 6 of 7 - Jo Alcock Consulting
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Reflection

Last week, I gave a seminar on 'Managing yourself: how to be productive with your time'. I'd been invited by CILIP Career Development Group London and South East branches to deliver a session on this topic which expanded on my presentation from Internet Librarian International 2012 on Productivity for Librarians. The focus of this seminar was much more practical in nature so rather than just talking through some of the tools I use and the way I implement the Getting Things Done (GTD) methodology, we went through each stage of the GTD methodology and considered how it could be implemented...

This evening I'll be delivering a seminar for the CILIP Career Development Group (London and South East division) on Managing yourself: how to be productive with your time. I've given presentations on this topic before, and have blogged about it, but when I was invited to deliver this session I was initially unsure if I could fill 2hrs based in my knowledge. It's also been a while since I delivered a longer session like this - I used to on a regular basis (for students, researchers or academic staff) in my subject librarian role, but most of my recent public speaking has been conference presentation of around 20-30 minutes in length (with some discussion if I can fit it in but largely just 'chalk and talk' style). I thought I would benefit from learning some new skills/techniques so decided to read How to run a great workshop by Nikki Highmore Sims.

Apologies in advance for what may be a very confused post, I've had lots of thoughts running through my head that I wanted to write down! [caption id="" align="alignright" width="120" caption="I'm not one of these (though I did use this in my presentation at my first library job interview!)"][/caption] Well, you're reading Joeyanne Libraryanne so I'm guessing that after reading the title of the blog post you're thinking, "erm...

This week's chartership chat we're going to try theming the discussion. We had a great suggestions from one of the attendees, Kelly Quaye: [blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/#!/kcquaye/status/175305291225763843"] It's a really common topic people want to discuss so I think it will be a really useful conversation. In preparation for the conversation I thought I'd share the methods I'm using to collect information about my activities and potential evidence, the main one of which is a Google form. There are a number of different tables or matrices for collating information about your evidence and I thought it would be useful to set one up as a Google spreadsheet and populate it using a Google form. The idea is that I can use the form to add information to the spreadsheet from anywhere at any point without having to load a document up first.

  by  mnadi  I didn't actually think I'd be writing a blog post about this yet - chairing meetings was on my list of things I'd be doing later this year (in my role as chair of CILIP West Midlands) but there was confusion over the date of the committee changeover. Seeing as the current chair couldn't attend the committee meeting earlier this week at the last minute, the rest of the committee decided I should chair the meeting (which left the Vice Chair very confused as the current Chair had asked him to stand in). Unfortunately I got lost on my way...

As I'm currently working on my CILIP Chartership, I'm getting into the habit of reflecting on any professional activities. I also think it's good practice after a conference to reflect on what you learnt (in terms of the conference content and also the logistics and organisational aspects), and had an interesting conversation last night at dinner about how useful it was to record the lessons learned after each conference (we also discussed how at a conference it was common to have more showers than meals!*). So here are a few points I have been mulling over after ALA Midwinter 2012...

Last week I gave my first ever webinar as part of the American Library Association (ALA) Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) Mobile Computing Interest Group (MCIG) virtual meeting.* It took place instead of a physical meeting at ALA Midwinter to enable more people to attend and present. There were five presentations in 90 minutes so we each had 10 minutes to present and 5 minutes of Q&A. If you're interested in the topic, you can watch a recording of the webinar - see the blog post I wrote for our m-library community support project blog. I thought it would be useful to reflect on my experiences of presenting a webinar - I'm noticing more and more webinars set up to enable more people to attend virtually across different time zones and without the expense of travelling, so I imagine presenting at webinars is something we'll be seeing a lot more of in future.This is my setup - home office with laptop for webinar software, headset for listening/speaking, iPhone for timing, and iPad and notepad for presentation prompts (and all important glass of Ribena!): [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Webinar setup"]Webinar setup[/caption]

I get asked this question a lot, and I often struggle to answer it. My job is pretty unique so there's not really much to easily compare it to. I'm part of an academic library but rarely set foot into the library. I have an office on a University campus but don't visit it very often as I regularly work from home or on the go (the train is a favourite of mine!). My job title is Evidence Based Researcher; if you asked me I would probably tell you I'm an academic researcher/librarian, but my partner would probably say he wasn't really sure how to describe it but I'm a sort of information consultant. So what do I actually do? The Special Libraries Association (SLA) have organised an Alternative Careers webinar to help introduce some of the more alternative jobs out there in the information profession. Bethan Ruddock, who is the webinar host, asked me if I'd be able to answer some questions about my job to help her research for the webinar (Bethan also has a pretty unique job but wants to get some other examples to share). I was happy to oblige and am reproducing what I sent her. So if you're not sure what I actually do, this might give you more of an idea...

I'm a creature of habit, so I'm continuing the tradition of posting an end of year blog post (see 2008, 2009, and 2010). It's actually really useful for me to look back and see what I did each year. So, what has 2011 involved? 2011 mosaic 1. My ALA 2011 badge complete with ribbons!, 2. Louisiana State University, 3. Osney Building at University of Oxford, 4. CILIP signage